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Posts tagged with visualization

How much money can you make from advertising online?
Maybe $10 per thousand clicks.
On statistical chart-making: All of the interesting information is contained on the left-hand scale numberings. But that information is de-emphasised in the presentation.

How much money can you make from advertising online?

Maybe $10 per thousand clicks.

On statistical chart-making: All of the interesting information is contained on the left-hand scale numberings. But that information is de-emphasised in the presentation.


hi-res




roads in the USA
by Fathom.info, makers of Processing HT @traviskolton
Compare to those famous light maps of the USA:






Other nice ones on the same topic. You can’t compare visually to the “new view” of the roads vis-à-vis the lights, but who doesn’t love looking at these pics? I don’t want to leave most of the world out just because the US produces the most data.
Don’t have a roads pic of the world but here’s a lights-at-night pic of the world:




Europe:

European Night Lights A recently released satellite picture from NOAA illustrates the changes in nighttime lights in Europe between 1992 and 2009. Yellow regions show where lights have increased, purple places indicate where lights have decreased, and white areas show no change.



Mother India:

And some O(10MB) images of the world at night: http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view.php?id=55167



Nighttime satellite image of Europe, derived from U.S. Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS).


Dear Heavenly Leader in North Korea keeping the light pollution down:



links may be broken on this one, but promises dark-sky pics of SA, ME, Africa, and some “remote” (primitive living) areas
Back to the USA roadmap by Fathom.info, here’s San Francisco:

Appalachia:

Interesting twitters, if you like this, are @fathominfo and @impure140. (Impure being another visual programming language besides Processing.)

roads in the USA

by Fathom.info, makers of Processing HT @traviskolton

Compare to those famous light maps of the USA:

http://cdn2.sbnation.com/imported_assets/721758/image_thumbnail_aspx.jpg

http://dmsp.ngdc.noaa.gov/pres/low_light_120701/images/USA_29.GIF

usa_small.jpg

http://dmsp.ngdc.noaa.gov/pres/low_light_120701/images/USA_POS.GIF

Thumbnail goes

Other nice ones on the same topic. You can’t compare visually to the “new view” of the roads vis-à-vis the lights, but who doesn’t love looking at these pics? I don’t want to leave most of the world out just because the US produces the most data.

Don’t have a roads pic of the world but here’s a lights-at-night pic of the world:

http://aidwatchers.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Lights-at-night.png

http://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/news/20011105/flat_earth_nightm.jpg

http://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/news/20011105/usa_nightm.jpg

http://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/news/20011105/europe_nightm.jpg

Europe:

Photograph from satellite data showing nighttime lights throughout Europe.



European Night Lights

A recently released satellite picture from NOAA illustrates the changes in nighttime lights in Europe between 1992 and 2009. Yellow regions show where lights have increased, purple places indicate where lights have decreased, and white areas show no change.

http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/sseop/images/EFS/lowres/ISS023/ISS023-E-29061.JPG

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_UeuaziTfv8Q/TOhGTAVwtuI/AAAAAAAAAGo/CImF7gX483g/s1600/france+italy+border+small.jpg

Mother India:

http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/dmsp/image/india_03_98_92_a.jpg

http://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/55000/55167/earth_lights.gif

And some O(10MB) images of the world at night: http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view.php?id=55167

http://img1.jurko.net/wall/paper/earth_at_the_night_1024x768.jpg

Photograph from satellite data showing nighttime lights throughout Europe.

Nighttime satellite image of Europe, derived from U.S. Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS).

http://images.texas.ynn.com/media/weather/onair/0727-london_lights_at_night.jpg

Map of night lights showing the growth of urban lights in Europe between 1992 and 2010.

Dear Heavenly Leader in North Korea keeping the light pollution down:

http://whyfiles.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/citylights_china.jpg

links may be broken on this one, but promises dark-sky pics of SA, ME, Africa, and some “remote” (primitive living) areas

Back to the USA roadmap by Fathom.info, here’s San Francisco:

Appalachia:

Interesting twitters, if you like this, are @fathominfo and @impure140. (Impure being another visual programming language besides Processing.)


hi-res







Economic geography of the eastern USA
circa 1999, median incomes by zip code
Code and data source to follow in a longer post.

Economic geography of the eastern USA

circa 1999, median incomes by zip code


Code and data source to follow in a longer post.


hi-res




These charts are undeniably beautiful, but they violate Tufte principles 1, 4, 7, 10, 11, 12.

Charts can look great but E Tufte says we should let the data do the talking, rather than the design. Adding some sparkle to the data is “wrong” or at least, Tufte-wrong, for data-graphics.

Here it seems like the talented artist has tried to “add some sparkle and theme” to “boring numbers” — rather than accentuating what’s exciting about the numbers themselves. To my way of thinking, if the message the numbers are telling you is interesting, then that makes the numbers worth looking at.

  • Did you say I could get a 25% raise?!
  • Did you say people are 30% taller than they were 250 years ago?
  • Did you say a 19% chance of rain on our wedding today? Or 90%?
  • Did you say the cost of electricity is one-one-hundredth of what it was 90 years ago?
  • Did you say my heating bill is double what it needs to be if I insulated better?
  • A man and a mouse are only one order of magnitude apart?
  • I could commute across America on a bike if I were two orders of magnitude faster?
  • Did you say that 99% of the people own 1% of the wealth? Or was it 99.999% of the people owning .000001% of the wealth? Or both? Wait, these numbers are actually crucial to the story!

Of course it’s no surprise that most people think cifras son aburridas — since their main memory of figures is through boring maths class, rather than as integral elements of a story.

What it’s talking about:

As in the wieners I drew, it’s not easy to make the logically beautiful look visually beautiful.

(Source: softwareadvice.com)
















multiplicities of freedom demonstrates Chaos Theory in Excel. If he filled in more initial values, you would see a thick bar—like a picture of white-noise.

Butterflies flapping their wings in Vermont to change the wind in Hangzhou?
A drop of water on Jeff Goldblum’s hand taking a very different path down depending on random parameters?
Or—as in multiplicitiesoffreedom's picture—like a hashing function, the codomain being a highly-discrepant reordering|shuffle of the domain?

I found a paper on Chaos Theory as a metaphor for Institutional Economics and I just couldn’t help but play around with the equations inside. (Like the methodology of inst. econ)

For those who want to play around with the logistic map in R as well as Excel, do:
require(fNonlinear)
?lorentzSim
y = logisticSim()
plot(y, col=rgb(.1,.1,.1,.75) )

multiplicities of freedom demonstrates Chaos Theory in Excel. If he filled in more initial values, you would see a thick bar—like a picture of white-noise.

a chaotic process (logistic map) generated & drawn in R
white (Gaussian) noise

  • Butterflies flapping their wings in Vermont to change the wind in Hangzhou?
  • A drop of water on Jeff Goldblum’s hand taking a very different path down depending on random parameters?
  • Or—as in multiplicitiesoffreedom's picture—like a hashing function, the codomain being a highly-discrepant reordering|shuffle of the domain?


I found a paper on Chaos Theory as a metaphor for Institutional Economics and I just couldn’t help but play around with the equations inside. (Like the methodology of inst. econ)

For those who want to play around with the logistic map in R as well as Excel, do:

require(fNonlinear)
?lorentzSim
y = logisticSim()
plot(y, col=rgb(.1,.1,.1,.75) )


hi-res




Skitter plot of scientific collaboration between researchers 2005–2009. via greigmarshall
Unweighted bidirectional graph. The thin pen brings out the graph’s thick global connectivity.

Skitter plot of scientific collaboration between researchers 20052009. via greigmarshall

Unweighted bidirectional graph. The thin pen brings out the graph’s thick global connectivity.


hi-res




gasprice.png 18 Month Average Retail Gas Price

 gasbreakdown.png

Cost breakdown

gas graph.png

The Atlantic's guess of the causes of the coming near-term oil price increases.

Link: US Department of Energy’s summer fuel price outlook